Nursing Licensure Compact

The Nursing Licensure Compact (NLC) allows nurses to have one license to practice in multiple states. There are currently 34 states which have enacted NLC legislation, meaning they recognize the multi-state license or have such legislation pending. For a full list of NLC states, see below.

Benefits of NLC States

The Nursing Licensure Compact (NLC) removes complications for nurses practicing in multiple states. Nurses from NLC states are able to work across state lines without having to worry about applying for licensure in each state or being burdened by multiple renewal requirements and fees. With more nurses practicing across state lines, state boards of nursing are coordinating now more than ever before — helping to expand the mobility of nurses as part of the nation’s wider healthcare system.

Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC)

The enhanced nurse licensure compact (eNLC) was implemented on January 19, 2018, which included 29 states. The eNLC legislation allows registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical/vocational nurses in the eNLC member states to have one multistate license. These nurses are now able to practice in person or through telehealth in their home state of licensure and other eNLC member states.

Licensure requirements in these member states are all aligned. When nurses apply for a multistate license, they are assured that other eNLC states have the same requirements allowing for mobility of their career/practice. eNLC member states include:

  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • Colorado
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Idaho
  • Iowa
  • Kentucky
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • New Hampshire
  • New Mexico
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Oklahoma
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Virginia
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

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Eligibility for Multi-State License

In order to apply for a multi-state nursing license, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You must reside in an NLC state, and you must declare an NLC state as your primary state of residency.
  • You must be actively licensed as a registered nurse (RN) or licensed professional nurse (LPN)/licensed vocational nurse (LVN).
  • You must meet any requirements for licensure held by your home state, though when practicing, you will also be held to the standards of the state where the patient or practice is located.

Nursing License Compact States

*Indicates awaiting implementation

  • Alabama
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • Colorado
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Idaho
  • Indiana*
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey*
  • New Mexico
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Oklahoma
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Virginia
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

NLC States/Territories With Legislation Pending

  • Guam
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • Washington
  • Vermont

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Information on nursing compact licensure states was last retrieved on February 11, 2020. For the most up-to-date information, check with your state board of nursing.